What Makes A Mesothelioma Attorney Successful?

Claims involving asbestos and mesothelioma demand experience, perseverance and a strong team working with the attorneys on your case. Mesothelioma is a terrifying disease and the afflicted need the support and expertise of a full team, who can immediately begin work.

Mesothelioma is a very aggressive disease. You cannot afford to wait for your attorney to get up to speed with the complexities of claims involving asbestos and mesothelioma. Our attorneys at The Gori Law Firm have the experience with these matters to begin helping you recover compensation as soon as we meet with you. We have recovered billions in compensation for our clients and we know how important it is for you and your family to receive your compensation as soon as possible.

How Can You Find An Attorney Who Specializes In Mesothelioma And Asbestos Exposure In Texas?

You likely have seen late night commercial advertising attorneys who work with clients suffering from mesothelioma after exposure to asbestos. But those advertisement tell you little beyond a name and a phone number. What you really need to know about a law firm in Texas is their experience and their ability to handle all the moving parts of a complex case. And mesothelioma cases are always complex. The Gori Law Firm has the experience with mesothelioma cases and the resources to ensure your claims are properly filed and you and your family receive the compensation you need.

These cases demand prompt attention and action because the health effects of mesothelioma are so devastating. Our attorneys and staff have worked many families dealing with this devastating news and they offer compassion and demonstrate their concern by effectively working to build your case for compensation. Our attorneys at The Gori Law Firm have recovered billions in compensation for individuals and their families and we will use that experienced to help you and your family.

Where Are You Most At Risk For Asbestos Exposure?

The short answer is everywhere. Asbestos has been used in the United States and in Texas for more than 100 years. It has often been associated with heavy industry, such as shipbuilding, oil refining and other large manufacturing operations. It used to be mined, so workers in mines where it was extracted were at great risk, as well as some miners working in other types of mines, as asbestos is a naturally-occurring mineral which may be located with other minerals being extracted. But those are only the most obvious sources. The reach of asbestos-containing materials is far greater and vastly deadlier than is first supposed.

Asbestos: Its Everywhere

Asbestos was once seen as a 'miracle' substance. A mineral fiber, it could be processed into many uses, possessing flexibility along with fire retardant and electrical insulation capabilities.

It was used to make a wide array of products, including:

Virtually any use that would benefit from the fireproofing, insulating or strength employed asbestos. During much of the 20 th century, it was nearly ubiquitous. Because many of the former uses have diminished, it is often predicted that the number of cases of mesothelioma should be declining. Sadly, that has not happened, and there are still a surprising number of new cases appearing every year, due in part to its pervasiveness.

An Insidious And Ubiquitous Killer

It is unfortunately that asbestos is a very useful substance. And that is why it is so dangerous. Because it was so useful it has been used a very wide range of forms, products and locations. It can be woven into fabric and used in pot holders and used in insulation wrapped around a high-pressure steam pipe in a powerplant. It can be in brake pads on your motorcycle or the floor tiles in your home.

The dark side of asbestos became apparent very early on. The companies who mined and processed the fiber into thousands of uses noticed that certain workers who were exposed to dust during the process suddenly began to develop unusual lung diseases.

Internal studies by the companies were carefully managed to limit who was allowed to see them, and while they made some effort to protect the workers, they never informed them of the frightening nature of the real risk they faced. As each lung disease was identified, claims were made that the risks were limited and could be minimized. As the National Cancer Site notes ominously, "Everyone is exposed to asbestos at some time during their life," but those who work in and around asbestos and the products that contained it are most likely to fall victim.

Still Not Banned

Many people still believe that asbestos was banned in the 1980s. While there was an effort by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate the substance, manufacturers sued to undercut those efforts and they prevented the regulations from going into force. While the use of asbestos-containing products have declined and many nations have banned their sale or use, there is no official ban in the United States.

Who Is Most At Risk From Asbestos?

Those most at risk are those with the greatest exposure for the longest time. The specific workers at risk has changed over time, as more has been learned about asbestos and the diseases it causes.

Workers closely connected to the mining and processing of asbestos were the first to fall ill. Throughout the massive buildup of industrial capacity in this county during the 20 th Century, the companies that mined, remained silent as to the risk. Internally they worked to minimize dust within plants, which was thought to cause most of the illnesses. But it eventually became apparent that asbestos was a very slow killer.

During the last 70 years, as workers have developed asbestosis, mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases, another dangerous aspect of asbestos became apparent. It was not limited to the workers. The long latency period before the symptoms of these illnesses masked its presence not only in workers, but in their families, too.

Family members of workers who were regularly exposed to asbestos were shocked to find that they, too, were at risk. Wives who washed their husband's work clothes have developed mesothelioma as a consequence of handling asbestos dust-laden clothing in the laundry.

Even the children of these workers were not spared. These children, as adults, came to realize that they had developed mesothelioma from simply giving their dads a hug when they returned home from work. In some towns with mines or processing plants, there were cases where residents who simply lived nearby developed these terrible conditions.

Construction And Demolition

At first, mesothelioma and asbestos primarily appeared in workers in asbestos mining, processing, heavy industry and shipbuilding. Today, the focus has begun to shift towards other workers. Virtually every structure built prior to the mid-1990s very likely has some amount of asbestos lurking within its walls. In Texas, there are thousands of buildings containing untold amounts of asbestos.

Because of this, construction workers, remodelers, demolition workers and even homeowners doing their own remodeling are at risk any time they drill, saw, break apart or perform any action that could release asbestos fibers into the air. Sawing and drilling are high risk activities, as they aerosolize the asbestos into it fibers, which can float in the air, be inhaled and lodge deep in the lungs where they begin to do the damage that leads to mesothelioma.

Other workers at risk are those in the automobile maintenance and repair industry, especially those who work on brakes and clutch assemblies. Brake shoes and pads are common items where asbestos has been used and because brakes naturally wear and abrade, they release asbestos fibers in their dust. While careful workplace treatment asbestos can reduce the risk, but there is no safe level of exposure to asbestos, a single exposure is all it takes to potentially produce mesothelioma. Because it so prevalent in buildings and structures, firefighters are also at risk for inhaling dust or smoke containing these deadly fibers.

How Long Does Mesothelioma Take To Develop?

One of the most deceptive aspects of asbestos exposure is the length of time it takes for symptoms to develop. It is not uncommon for decades to elapse from exposure to the first signs of mesothelioma developing. For many years the industry was able to dismiss claims due to the long timeframes. Some researchers even disbelieved that mesothelioma was a real condition.

Now we know, unfortunately, that mesothelioma is an all too real disease with devastating consequences for those who contract it. It can take various forms, including pleural mesothelioma develops in the pleura, which surrounds the lungs. Peritoneal mesothelioma is less common, and develops in the lining of the organs of the abdomen. There are additional forms of the disease, all of which are devastatingly deadly.

While mesothelioma and asbestosis are more likely to occur in workers who were subjected to high exposures for long periods, mesothelioma can show up in people who had very brief exposures. Cases have appeared in people who did little more than walk through part of a building that was being renovated or who may have worked in an office building where demolition or remodeling was being done in another area.

Our Attorney Can Help With Your Claim

When it became clear in the 1980s that tens of thousands of workers had been exposed and were now sick and dying, their lawsuits overwhelmed the industry. The courts set up trusts to maintain funds for workers as they became ill and made claims. Our attorneys at The Gori Law Firm are very experienced with the complex claims process and we can help you understand the process while we work to obtain the compensation you need.

Depending on where you worked, you may be able to file a claim with a trust, file a separate personal lawsuit and, if you were a veteran, you may be able to obtain veterans benefits. Our lawyers can help you with this process, helping you to maximize the compensation you receive for illness. Contact us today for a free case review.